Teach chemistry

Teach chemistry

Teaching chemistry requires great talent, and the rewards are equally brilliant. It challenges you to find creative ways of ensuring all pupils have the same opportunities to understand the subject and its importance in everyday life. That’s why exceptional trainee chemistry teachers continue to be in demand – eligible for the highest training bursaries, or even a prestigious scholarship from the Royal Society of Chemistry.

More top-performing professionals and recent graduates are choosing to make a difference by teaching chemistry. The percentage of trainee teachers of the subject with a 2:1 or first has been at record levels for the past two academic years.

It’s become increasingly popular with A level students too – with the proportion of pupils opting to study chemistry rising year on year since 2010 to reach record levels.

The perks don't end with the financial incentives to train, either. A career as a chemistry teacher also offers:

  • a competitive starting salary and the stability of knowing that top chemistry teachers are always in demand
  • working in a trusted profession with brilliant peers and plenty of opportunities to not only climb the career ladder, but also keep your subject knowledge up-to-date

You can also finish work each day knowing you’ve made a difference to young people’s lives and futures – there aren’t many careers that offer that kind of job satisfaction.

Subject knowledge enhancement and financial support

Don’t worry if you feel like you need to brush up on your knowledge of chemistry to be able to teach the subject. If the school(s) or university leading your training think you have the right skills to be a great chemistry teacher but could do with refreshing or boosting your knowledge, they could ask you to complete a subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) course ahead of starting your teacher training.

These courses are fully-funded, and you could be eligible for a bursary of up to £7,200 to support you during your SKE course, should you need to take one – your training provider will discuss this with you. Find out more.

You could also benefit from a top-end bursary during your main teacher training course, even if your degree isn’t in chemistry – so it’s always worth enquiring with your chosen training provider to find out about the support that’s available. Find out more about chemistry bursaries and scholarships.

Get up to

£25k

to train as a chemistry teacher in 2015/16

Earn up to

£65k*

as a leading practitioner

*Conditions apply

Charlotte reflects on the feeling she gets when year 7 students see her lab for the first time. Transcript (PDF, 75KB)

I have the potential to be amazingly creative with chemistry and make it accessible all of my pupils.

Dr John Fennell, newly qualified chemistry teacher

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